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Author: Mary Scherpe

Christoph Schlingensief Church of Fear at KW Berlin

Art in Berlin: Christoph Schlingensief

Last Saturday Mitte saw the opening of the year: finally, after several delays, the Christoph Schlingensief exhibition, curated by Klaus Biesenbach, Anna-Catharina Gebbers and Susanne Pfeffer with the artistic advisory of Schlingensief’s widow, Aino Laberenz, was opened at Kunst-Werke. What was initially planned by Pfeffer and Schlingensief himself, is now, three years after his death, finally visible in the in Auguststraße – although the curators repeatedly insist that it’s not a retrospective, not a concluding show, but the starting point for various inspections of Schlingensief, it’s certainly the broadest survey of his creative work to date. Which also means you should take your time to get at least a glimpse of the massive amount of material on display. Some say you’ll need five days to view it all.

Rough sea at Heiligendamm, Ostseebad

Escape: Baltic Sea

December might be an unusual time to plan a weekend-Ausflug, but certainly one of the best – the early days of winter are especially hard to bear and are easier to stand when in beautiful nature – we chose, once again, the Baltic Sea. Within merely 3 hours by car you’ll visit one of the most lovely landscapes Germany has to offer.

Croque Madame at 3 Minutes sur Mer

Breakfast in Berlin: 3 Minutes Sur Mer

I said it before, having breakfast in Berlin is not as easy as you think or hope. Most places interpret breakfast as a plate filled with bland cheese covered in sugary jam and decorated with sad pieces of fruit. Trying to find a place with decent egg dishes served in a pleasant atmosphere is a constant struggle – I can’t find much in Mitte where I like to spend my Sunday mornings – I like Mogg&Melzer’s Shakshuka, Meierei’s scrambled eggs and above all this place: 3 Minutes sur Mer.

bread at wiener brot

Bakeries in Berlin: A Best Of

This time we’ve teamed up with style blog extraordinaire ignant.de to explore the best of bakeries in Berlin. Sadly much of Germany’s bread baking tradition has been lost and most bakeries you’ll find in Berlin sell warmed up dough pieces that merely deserve to be called bread. Luckily, there have always been people working on keeping delicious bread without artificial additives or chemistry tricks a staple in German households. The past years have spurred a new interest in artisanal breads and some brave people took the chance and started new bread businesses. Here are five outstanding examples of German (and Austrian) bread craft in Berlin (in alphabetic order):