Category: Art

Berlin gallery weekend, Niche Berlin guide, Berlin art weekend, Berlin art guide

Guide: Niche Berlin’s Gallery Weekend

It’s that time of spring again and this time it’s an anniversary – Gallery Weekend is turning 10 years already! Who would’ve thought… There’ll be plenty of amazing gallery shows, opening, performances and events. But where to go first!?!?
However, most of the mega-shows at the big galleries will be on view for a couple of weeks, and they’re always a bit too crowded during Gallery Weekend, so you won’t see much of the actual works anyway.
We suggest you go for more fun activities and discover the lesser known spots of the Berlin art scene in the coming days. We asked Berlin’s art connoisseurs extraordinaire – Niche Berlin – to let us know which galleries and performance we’d better not miss.

In case you want to know more about this city’s artists, art spaces and studios, we seriously recommend you book a tour with Niche Berlin!

Berlin art, art in Berlin, Schinkel Pavillon, Camille Henrot

Art in Berlin: Camille Henrot at Schinkel Pavillon

When I heard that Camille Henrot, the young French artist known for winning the Silver Lion at last year’s Biennale, was planning to present Japanese Ikebana at Schinkel Pavillon I was instantly intrigued how she’ll translate this traditional and heavily symbolic yet strikingly minimal art of arranging flowers into a contemporary art installation in the center of Europe. While I certainly wasn’t be able to figure out each and every symbol and its meaning, the exhibition presented in the distinctive octagon pavilion just off Unter den Linden is remarkable nonetheless.

Christoph Schlingensief Church of Fear at KW Berlin

Art in Berlin: Christoph Schlingensief

Last Saturday Mitte saw the opening of the year: finally, after several delays, the Christoph Schlingensief exhibition, curated by Klaus Biesenbach, Anna-Catharina Gebbers and Susanne Pfeffer with the artistic advisory of Schlingensief’s widow, Aino Laberenz, was opened at Kunst-Werke. What was initially planned by Pfeffer and Schlingensief himself, is now, three years after his death, finally visible in the in Auguststraße – although the curators repeatedly insist that it’s not a retrospective, not a concluding show, but the starting point for various inspections of Schlingensief, it’s certainly the broadest survey of his creative work to date. Which also means you should take your time to get at least a glimpse of the massive amount of material on display. Some say you’ll need five days to view it all.